Danny Correa RIP

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Eddie Paxil-Commish
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Danny Correa RIP

Post by Eddie Paxil-Commish » Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:27 am

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This is one of my best friends Danny Correa. He was one of the great musical influences on me. We were in bands together, and we went through the critical high school years of our lives together. I was blessed enough to play his last show with him. That's where this picture is from. We lost him on 9/11 in tower 1. Remember
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Eddie Paxil
OMLB Commissioner
New Jersey Pioneers GM (2025-Present) Continental Expansion League Champions 2025 and 2026
Miami Marlins GM (2014-2024) NL East Champions 2016, 2019, & 2022

User avatar
Eddie Paxil-Commish
Site Admin
Posts: 1960
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 3:42 am
Location: Union City, New Jersey
Contact:

Re: Danny Correa RIP

Post by Eddie Paxil-Commish » Mon Sep 11, 2017 2:05 pm

About 16 years, 1 hour, and 10 minutes ago all our lives were changed. Some were affected directly. I don't have the benefit of seeing 9/11 as an event that happened to my country as a whole. Or I something that happened over in New York City. 16 years, 1 hour, and 10 minutes it killed one of my best friend's while he was on the 98th Floor of 1 World Trade Center. Danny A. Correa-Gutoerrez, proud son of Columbian immigrants and one himself was at work. A job he was placed at by Berkeley College He was about to receive his Bachelor's with honors in accounting. He had just fought for custody of his daughter Katrina.

I met Danny my freshman year of high school at Emerson High in Union City, and my life was never the same. He gave more than he asked for. He saw the potential in everyone. We played music together. We shared achievements. We cried together. Once him in my arms. I wish he was here as I cry typing this. I often share the photos of his last two shows with his band Lucid A. I just want that photo of him circling around the internet to go away. Because it was on a poster board around his father's neck that said, "Have you seen my son?" He clung to hope even though 20 minutes later as I handed him photos he asked if I had any of Danny's tattoo, and I knew why.

I was often timid about sharing the photos you see here because of the one where I pranked him, and I thought the world wouldn't get it. To hell with it, he would. Our friend and his drummer Matthew Wells once said knowing Danny was "an experience." Boy that's the truth. The interesting thing about these photos is this was the first band I fronted and wrote for. Danny had no problem joining, supporting me, and encouraging me. He had no problem doing that for anyone. Someone at his funeral said to me, "He did everything he was meant to do, and God needs him now." While I understand they meant well, bullshit. He was 25 years old. He had more to do. He had a daughter to raise, parents to make proud, a sister to watch become a woman, a band to take global, and more. God would've waited because all of those people needed him, and I needed him to if you'll let me be a bit selfish. One of the things in life my mother taught me was you can never have enough good people in your life.

Just before he died Danny said something to me on our way to rehearsal about our pursuit of music. He said, "We're all waiting for that one ear. That ear that hears us, gets it, and changes our life." He was right, and he was wrong. That ear comes along constantly even if it can't give you a record deal and make you famous. Danny hearing Oreste Rodriguez and vice versa changed their lives. Them hearing Joseph Potente and Matt changed their lives. All of them hearing me changed all our lives. It goes on and on. I wish I'd realized this when he said it and said, "Dude your surrounded by them."

I vowed to make him proud after his death. It wasn't an overnight thing it was a slow burn to that end. However, right now I'm a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society International like him. I'm months away from an Associate's degree, and just a couple of years from my Bachelor's like him. I'll be one of the most educated people in the history of my family as far as I know. I don't know what happens after you die, no human does or has ever known with certainty. All I feel I know is, "There is a God, and I'm not him." So I hope he's proud, and I feel blessed everyday that he met my wife before he passed and saw me find love, and that I got to rock a stage with him... one... last... time.

With these Hurricanes hitting the south I'm reminded of something I learned from his death. There's no need for fear of death sometimes. You can't prepare for certain things, no matter how hard you try. Just live what you believe to be a good life, enjoy it, and tell those you hold dear you love them. Because they could be gone in a flash in ways there was nothing you could do a thing about.
So enjoy these photos from the first show performed by The Drunken Yale Boys. Even if you weren't there I think you can imagine the laughs, the joy, and the fact that we were living in the moment. Remember what you see here about Danny.
001 Diggy.jpg
002 Diggy.jpg
003 Ohyouyawned.jpg
004 The Drunken Yale Boys.jpg
005 The Drunken Yale Boys at Escapades.jpg
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Eddie Paxil
OMLB Commissioner
New Jersey Pioneers GM (2025-Present) Continental Expansion League Champions 2025 and 2026
Miami Marlins GM (2014-2024) NL East Champions 2016, 2019, & 2022

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